Skip to main content

Hostel Review | Dreaming Rome Hostel (Rome)


Overall Rating ***** 5/5

During my 3 day stay in Rome, I stayed at the Dreaming Rome Hostel. When looking for a hostel to stay at in Rome, I read great things about Dreaming Rome Hostel, and my experience staying in this hostel certainly did not disappoint. 
If you are looking for a reasonably priced, fun and friendly accommodation with hosts who put a lot of effort in making their guests feel at home in Rome, then Dreaming Rome Hostel is highly recommended. 

Pro: Dreaming Rome Hostel provides a reasonably priced and well equipped accommodation where the hosts put a lot of effort into creating a fun, friendly and welcoming culture. 

Con: This is not a boutique/flashy/large accommodation so it is important to have the right expectations when booking at this hostel, however this is not necessarily a bad thing as the hostel felt lively and homely. 

Location ***** 4/5

Dreaming Rome Hostel is about six to seven minutes walk to the S Giovanni station or half an hours walk to the Colosseum.

On my arrival the hostel was initially hard to find as there wasn't good signage from the street. For those staying at this hostel, look for the Shooters Restaurant from Via Faleria Street and enter Via Cuma Street.

Although I didn't feel as comfortable walking around the streets of this area at night (compared to London and Paris), it none the less was safe and I did not encounter any issues or trouble. 

Check-in Process ***** 5/5

The check-in process went smoothly and was welcomed by the very friendly and helpful hostel host. 

On check-in I got:
  • Keys to the building and the apartment the hostel was in
  • A free map to the area
  • WI-FI password
  • Friendly and helpful tips on what to do in Rome
  • A glass of wine

The room ***** 5/5

  • Overall feel: The room had a lot of beds squeezed into a small space (8 - 10 beds). Though there weren't as much room to move as other hostel rooms I've slept in, this was not an issue. My sleep did get interrupted during the night by some of the guests not keeping quiet.
  • En-suite toilet and bathroom: No (Communal shower and bathroom shared with other rooms)
  • Bed: Bunk bed felt comfortable. 
  • Convenient power source for electronics: Yes
  • Security: Small locker for each guest in the room available to store valuables

Facilities and Services ***** 5/5



  • Laundry: Laundry service available
  • Kitchen: free use of the kitchen. Though I'm not sure why anyone would cook when in Rome given the number of nice restaurants available :)
  • Reception: Available at specific hours, although the hosts are very accomodating
  • Wi-Fi: Yes. A communal computer is also made available to guests.
  • Security: The rooms themselves are not locked, but the apartment and the building are locked and secured
  • Cleanliness: Well maintained and cleaned
  • Breakfast included: Yes
  • Cafe/Restaurant: No, there isn't a cafe/restaurant in this hostel. However the hostel does sell some basic supplies. 

Atmosphere ***** 5/5

Hostel Type: Fun and friendly atmosphere

This hostel is very different to the other hostels I've stayed at during my trip. Not only was the hosts friendly and welcoming, they spend a significant effort in making their guests feel welcome. During my stay the hosts made a lot of effort to get the guests together in the evening  to socialize whether by cooking pasta or ordering in pizza.

I feel that the effort the hosts put in to create a community, socialize and mingle with their guests is above and beyond what I've seen in other hostels and really what sets this place apart from others.

Though the hostel was not flashy or modern, it had a homely feel with friendly hosts and guests which creates a great atmosphere.

Popular posts from this blog

An intro to conditional validation and formatting in PowerApps (using SharePoint as a data source)

The Problem What if we need to create a form that changes it's behaviour based on the answer entered by the user.

For example, we need to build a leave request form that: Shows the comment field if applying for a sick leave, but hides the comment field if applying for a annual leaveRequires the requestor to write a comment if their sick leave is more than 1 day, but is optional if sick for just 1 day.  The default form interface for custom lists in SharePoint Online can be used for basic scenarios, but doesn't provide an easy way to add business logic described above (unless you want to write some javascript)

In the past InfoPath would have been the tool of choice for many, however this tool is now in maintenance mode and whilst it will still be supported for a wee while there will be no improvements or enhancements to the platform.

The Solution This is where PowerApps come in. PowerApps is now the platform that is recommended by Microsoft as a way for business users to create…

Uploading a file from a SharePoint document library into an Azure Blob Storage with Microsoft Flow (or Logic App)

The Problem One of the things that I've been experimenting with lately is Microsoft Flow. The service allows you to build process automation to facilitate transfer of information from one system to another easily.

One scenario I wanted to try out is to be able to copy/move a file from SharePoint to an Azure Blob Storage. There are a number of reasons that you may want to do this:

Archive files that are no longer neededUpload a copy of a file (usually an image) into a Blob Storage so that images can be hosted in a CDN to optimize page load performance In the past doing something like this would have required some form of custom development e.g. a remote event receiver. However the introduction of Microsoft Flow and Logic Apps has created another alternative that is worth exploring....

Update 30/09/16: If you are looking to put your assets into a CDN to make it load faster, then it's worth checking out the new Preview Release Office 365 Public Content Delivery Network (CDN) capab…

Only show a control to an employee's manager in PowerApps (using SharePoint as a data source)

The Problem In my previous blog post, I wrote a basic tutorial on configuring PowerApps to conditionally show/hide and make mandatory/optional a control based on the answer provided in a previous control.
In this blog post we will expand on that scenario to create a form that only shows a control called approval status to a user if that logged in user is the manager of the user specified in the employee control.
This means when the manager is using the application, they can change the status to approved. Meanwhile, a user that is not a manager of the person specified in the employee cannot change the status to approved. The Solution Aside from containing a variety of native functions, PowerApps also allow us to add connections to add functionalities into our app. In this case we will add the Office 365 Users connection so that we can get information on: The user that is logged onThe manager of the user specified in the employee controlNote: Whilst this solution makes it difficult for …